Archive for the ‘go kart plans’ Category

Anyone who has caught pictures or video of racing events from the early 20th century is probably aware that the engines in those cars were pushed to the max. Although they weren’t fast (at least as compared to today’s cars), they were driven all out as if they were. Where cars today have computer controlled modules and the like to push the horsepower up, many of these vintage cars had motors similar to typical passenger cars. One big difference was that these cars were stripped of unnecessary weight, and the motors were pushed to their limits. And with these limits came heat…and lots of it.

The inspiration for our go kart. Note the louvered hood.

During this period it was commonplace to cut louvers into the sides of the engine compartments in these cars for ventilation. I’m not sure if it made that much of a difference but regardless, it sure looked cool, almost resembling the gills of a shark.

If you’ve been following our project here you’ll know that our kart won’t be having an engine at all, however in the interest of looking like it does we will be installing some of these ventilation louvers.

I thought quite a bit about how best to go about this step. I considered cutting a rectangle out on each side and manufacturing wooden slots, or to place a hinged piece of wood that would allow access to the steering linkage. While both of the ideas are very doable, they would just be overly complex.

You too can have instant louvers for the small price of $1.49 each.

Our plans note to use a large heating type vent that I thought sounded heavy and may just look funny. One day while out running errands I dropped by the local Lowe’s. As it turned out they had tin panels, nice and thin, with louvers cut in them. These are panels that one would use say to provide ventilation in an attic or maybe on the top of a garage wall. They’re similar to what the plans noted, but since the plans were roughly twenty years old, these were probably just an updated version of what they were suggesting. The louvers were nice and light and relatively small.

The only drawback was that these had the louvers facing down, and I would have preferred them facing back but I can live with it.  Not only did these have the look I was wanting but the price was right as well. For a whopping $1.49 each our kart was going to be all set.

Before I dove into mounting the louvers I decided that I would make some changes to the top body panel. The plywood was plenty strong, and fit fine. The problem was rather that I realized that after raising the height of the dash (and steering wheel) there was a gap revealed where the boys could stick their hand inside.

Our shortened body top to prevent random objects from getting stuck.

I wasn’t so worried about getting a hand stuck but rather knew for sure that someone would drop a Hot Wheel, a baseball, or heck maybe a Popsicle in there and we couldn’t have that stuff stuck inside right? Although come to think of it wouldn’t be any different than my car. To this day there is a Hot Wheel that I can’t find in the back of my car that I’m reminded of every time I make a right hand turn as it rolls from one side to the other. When my boys grow up and have a family of their own I’ve secretly sworn to myself that I would hide various rolling toys in their cars as some sort of twisted revenge. When I ride with them I’ll then pretend to not hear a thing… it will be just fantastic.

To address this little issue I removed the body panel top, and cut it about 4 inches shorter, on the end closest to the grill. This now leave an open space so that anything that may happen to find it’s way up there will simply roll out the other side. I cut it down and refastened it to the body side rails with 4, 1.25″ wood screws.

With this piece now back in place the body now has the strength to stay rigid while the louver panels are screwed in. I measured back from the grill about 4″ and down from the body top about 3″ and held the louver panel into place. This left about 4″ of space between the bottom of the louvers and the frame rails. It’s in this space that I intend to mount the exhaust pipe so that should be fine.

The panels have six screw holes, each of which I marked with a pencil. I set the panels aside and drilled small pilot holes into the body.

Our engine compartment...now well ventilated.

Once the holes were all drilled I held our panels back up and ran each of the screws into place. I suppose using pop rivets would look better for mounting these, but I don’t happen to have a rivet gun. Besides using a screw would make it easier to remove them if I wanted or needed to later. In the end the screws, and louvers themselves, will all be painted so it won’t be too noticeable anyway.

There we go, some good eye candy for our kart. Next will either be our faux exhaust pipe, or the aluminum body top, I’m not sure which but probably the exhaust since having access from the top will make things a bit easier.

By this point the boys and I are getting anxious to get a test drive in, but we really need some brakes on our kart. I started this phase by first confirming exactly where to mount the crank in the frame. The challenge here is that I need to account for both 6 year olds and an 8 year old, so the length of their legs is quite different. If I placed the crank too far back my older son would hit his knees on the dash, but if I placed it too far forward my younger boys wouldn’t be able to reach it.

I had my oldest son sit in the kart and I immediately realized that, unfortunately, wherever I placed the crank he was going have trouble- you see his knees clearly were going to hit the dash. It was obviously just as much of an issue as to where the dash was placed as it was where the crank was placed. Unfortunately I already mounted the dash. Sigh. Well, I decided to remove the dash and rebuild it. Better to deal with this now rather than later.

New dash and angle cut for steering column.

New dash and angle cut for steering column.

I told my wife about this minor setback. She said that the only one that will be able to fit in the kart would be George, our medium sized mix breed Pinscher. I think she was joking because there is no way his rear paws could reach the pedals, his curly tail wouldn’t fit in the seat and I don’t think he could steer or at least not very well seeing that he has no opposable thumbs, besides that I think he has ADD so there is no way he would sit still long enough.

Anyway, I went and picked up another piece of 1×6 pine and penciled out a new dash. This time I took a slightly different approach in that I decided to make it taller (to account for space for their knees) and to also mount it higher in the body as well as a bit further forward. This higher placement would not just help with space, but also make the overall kart taller which will just look better as well. After cutting out the new dash I marked the place the steering column will come through. Like with my first pass at this step I will drill a 1″ hole through the dash for the steering column. The difference with this time is that I opted not to drill the hole square, but rather to drill it at about a 18 degree angle which will lean the steering wheel also a bit higher which will help with leg room.

Hole in frame rail to make way for the crank.

Hole in frame rail to make way for the crank.

Next I determined where the crank would be placed in the frame and I drilled a pilot hole through the frame on both sides. Now on to manufacturing the crank itself. I headed back to Home Depot and picked up one 36″ length of 1″ non-threaded steel rod. Why non threaded you may ask? I’ll get to that in moment. Here I spent some time measuring, thinking, sketching, and doing more measuring before I proceeded. As the old saying goes, “Measure twice, bend once.“.

The objective here was to bend this rod into a crank, with each section being a specific length. At first glance it may not seem like much but I also had to account for the narrowing of the frame as the rider would turn the crank through it’s full rotation. On the forward part of a rotation the frame would be almost two inches narrower than when the rider had the other foot on the back side of the rotation.

I referred to our sacrificial Spiderman bike to determine how far the reach for each pedal should be. Knowing that I only had a total length of 36″ I didn’t have much room for error here. The bicycle had 6″ of reach for each pedal, that would mean that my crank would need 24″ just for the total of the pedal lengths, plus 4” for the “pedals” themselves. Throw in needed length on the ends and I realized that I needed to reclaim some otherwise my single 36″ piece just wasn’t going to work. I decided to make the throw, or length, of each pedal only 5″ instead of 6″. Doing this gives a bit more length that I could use on the sprocket side since it needs to reach out a few inches to align with the rear sprocket on our drive wheel, as well as makes it a bit easier to pedal for the little riders.

IMG_0294

Bending the steel rod for our crank.

I measured out the segments on the rod and marked them with a permanent marker. I placed the rod in my bench vise and slipped a 4′ length of 3/4″ pipe over it. The boys were watching over my shoulder and Nick asked what I was going to do. I said “I’m going to bend this steel rod“. The word from his mouth simply was “Oh.“, but the look on his face said “Your yanking my chain Dad.“. I said here watch… and I proceeded to pull down on the pipe bending the first segment of 5” to 90 degrees (or thereabouts). The expression on his face was priceless. His mouth dropped open and his eyes were huge. I think from this day forward his Dad is, and always will be, the strongest man in the world.

I continued bending, measuring, and bending some more until I had something that resembled a starter handle from an old Model T Ford. One thing that I hadn’t even considered was if the pedals would sit too low to the ground!!?? Luckily that wasn’t the case. I wanted to put the crank in the frame next to get an idea of how well it would spin, etc. I slid in one side only to discover it was a hair too wide to allow me to insert the other side. I wasn’t suppose to assemble the frame around it… was I? Uggh. OK with a little elbow grease, and a big hammer, I was finally able to get it in.

IMG_0311

Threading the ends of the crank.

At this point you can probably see why I opted not for threaded rod. I wanted to keep the pedals smooth allowing for their feet to slide easily as it turned, and only have threads on the outside to attach it within the frame. Now that the bends are complete I can use a die and thread both ends of the rod.

Now for another tricky step in this crank assembly…the sprocket. Remember, we took the sprocket from our Spiderman bike and we’re going to use that here. In some cases the donor bike may not be able to have the sprocket removed from the crank, so your mileage may vary.

Our goal here is to mount the sprocket on the left side in alignment to the sprocket on the left rear wheel. There are so many variable angles here working against me that makes this a really tough step. We have the narrowing frame, the rear wheels mounted outward to compensate, the hand bent crank, and the holes in the frame the crank sit in, not to mention the alignment of the Moon and planets. Each of these can contribute one way or another to what will likely be a somewhat wobbly chain. I figured I had a better chance of proposing a successful public health care reform bill than getting this all in perfect alignment, but I’ll take what I can get.

The final bent rod forming our crank.

The final bent rod forming our crank.

So focusing back on the sprocket itself. The sprocket has a hole in the center that is approximately 3/4″ in diameter. It’s not simply a perfect circle, but rather has squared corners that provided a tight fit onto the crank of the bicycle. That was all fine and good for Spiderman and his BMX crime fighting escapades, but what good does that do our go kart? I needed to figure out a way to reduce the size of that hole so that we can mount the sprocket onto our crank and secure it. After a visit to my local hardware store (sorry when it comes to unique washers and fittings Home Depot just doesn’t cut it) I found what looks to be an ideal solution. I’ll have to attack it in a few steps but I think it will work out just fine.

Our loose Spiderman sprocket and the partially custom washer for it's center.

Our loose Spiderman sprocket and the partially ground down washer for it's center.

First step was to reduce the hole so that it will fit snugly. I found a 1/2″ washer that was just slightly larger than the hole in the sprocket. That is the center of the washer fit perfect over our crank, but the outside diameter was larger. I placed this washer underneath the sprocket on a flat surface and using a permanent marker I traced the shape of the hole in our sprocket onto the washer. This essentially made a template for me. I then grabbed some safety glasses, fired up my bench grinder and went to work.

From a distance the boys were watching me. As sparks bounced all over my hands and arms I could hear the boys yelling “Whoa!!!” and “Did you see those sparks!!!” followed with “That was awesome!!“. Not only am I the strongest man in the world but I can also deflect showers of sparks with my bare hands. I’m invincible! Well, at least to the boys I am, and that’s what really matters.

The sparks didn’t hurt much, but my wrist was a bit sore from bending the crank. If I’ve done anything with this project it’s show them just how willing I am to injure myself in the name of a go kart. Viva La Go Kart! I say.

The sprocket with our custom washer sitting cleanly in the center.

The sprocket with our custom washer sitting cleanly in the center.

In pretty short order I had a custom washer that fit just perfect. Next I whipped up a fresh batch of JB Weld. The ideal solution here would probably be to place a light mig weld to attach this washer to the sprocket, but since a mig welder is one tool I don’t have that’s far easier said than done. But what is JB Weld then you ask? It’s magic. Sort of. It’s a handy chemical compound (two compounds really) that when mixed together forms a bond between two pieces of steel that (in theory) is equivalent to a weld. I wouldn’t go quite that far, though I did have a friend in high school who repaired the intake manifold of a 1969 Camaro with it so it’s gotta be good enough for the go kart right?

I mixed equal parts of the JB Weld compound together and applied it to the edges where our new washer and the sprocket met. I then applied some more to two additional washers that I then placed on both sides, essentially sandwiching our custom washer in the middle.

Spiderman sprocket with our washers and castle nut JB Welded into place.

Spiderman sprocket with our washers and castle nut JB Welded into place.

Next I used a little more JB Weld to attach a castle nut onto our now custom sprocket. This nut will allow me to thread the entire sprocket onto the crank as a single unit. I waited a long 15 hours or so and carefully attached the sprocket assembly. The excitement was killing me. As it turned out the JB Weld just didn’t cut it when it came to ataching the chain. More on that below.

Now that we had the sprocket and the bent crank back in the frame I attached the sprocket onto the left side. I had the right idea with using JBWeld but unfortunately it just didn’t hold up once I attached the chain.

The force when the sprocket turned just was a bit too much. As soon as I put any kind of pressure here the castle nut would break away from the sprocket, and the sprocket would spin freely. As a result I just put a castle nut on both sides of the sprocket and cranked ‘er down with all I had. I was a bit worried I would strip the threads on the crank, but it seemed to hold.

Combning both chains to make one.

Combning both chains to make one.

Next I attacked the chain portion of this task. I took the chain from each donor bike, split them apart, and assembled one long chain to reach the back wheel. After I spent some time looking for a master link (that would have just been too simple now wouldn’t it have?) I just picked a random spot and wedged the link apart with a chisel. I reattached the ends of the chain together and voila… had a custom length chain to made order.

As they say, the devil is in the details, and these details are no different. I attached the chain and turned our pedals with the kart on the stand. I have to admit, seeing that wheel turn for the first time as a result of the hand bent crank, custom sprocket, etc. was pretty gratifying, but I have to say that the sprocket was wobbling all over the place. It was clear to me to that the chain would never stay on with that much travel.

Crank, sprocket and custom length chain in place.

Crank, sprocket and custom length chain in place.

It wasn’t the sprocket per se, but rather the bend of the crank. I removed the sprocket, removed the crank, and went back to the workbench for some more bending. I did this two or three times until I got the sprocket as close to “true” as I could. I still had a slight wobble, but not too bad, or so I thought.

Once I put the crank back into the frame, and was happy enough with the travel, I then adjusted the rear wheel to get the chain as tight as I could. I knew very well that anything I did at this point wasn’t absolutely final, but still wanted to get it as tight (not to mention safe) as I could since I wanted the boys to try it out.  Finally I got it to the point where I asked if they could take ‘er for a spin down the street.

What good is a test vehicle without test drivers? Helmet and flip flops tell me they're well prepared.

What good is a test vehicle without test drivers? Helmet and of course flip flops as any race driver can tell you are mandatory attire.

I’m not sure quite what I was expecting, but I know the boys and I were thrilled to see it reaching this point.  I had people driving by stopping to check it out and a couple of people ask me if I sold them… “Let me get this one done first and I’ll get back to you” I said.

Off they went. As I feared, the boys were able to pedal for about 15 feet when our chain would derail. The crank was still a bit too wobbly. This combined with the effort I put in to readjust the dash and pedal length, to see it’s just still too unwieldy for my oldest son made me a bit cranky.  I do think that if he could simply ride with his legs in front of him straight (as if pushing a gas/brake pedal) it would be just fine.

I’m afraid my wife was right that it was still too small, though I still don’t think George could drive it.

Although getting beyond my last update has taken 4+ weeks and I didn’t quite end up where I wanted to, I did make some good progress. I’ve realized that I don’t think I’m going to proceed with pedals but rather go straight to a motor of some sort.  That makes this somewhat of a frustrating step, but not a complete loss. I haven’t done anything to this point I can’t back out of, so a motor (even a small one) will be where I’m headed. Eliminating pedals will save quite a headache not to mention make dealing with alignment of the rear wheel a bit easier.

I think I’ll try hitting the flea market and garage sales to find a used electric scooter. A gas motor sounds great and all, but I think the uniqueness of having this electric would just make it… well more unique. Although I was anticipating jumping into finishing work and getting our aluminum flashing in place by now, I’m hesitant to go too far since I’ll need to drill some access holes into the boat tail for a motor.

I’m hoping to get something soon so stay tuned. And, if you or anyone you know has something like a Razor electric scooter sitting around and wants to get rid of it drop me a note from the contact page!

IMG_0142

Lower control arm ready for it's anchor bolt.

As I noted earlier, all of the parts from this project are readily available at most hardware stores. At this point I have my frame more or less together. Prior to squaring it I had to temporarily mount the upper and lower control arms. Once that was done I then removed them and drilled the holes for the king pins (or spindles). The spindles are used as a mounting point for the wheels, but also will provide roughly 40 degrees of turning radius. Go karts are definitely much more fun if they do more than just go straight.

The spindles each consist of 1/2″ galvanized pipe T fittings and are anchored in place via 3/8″ to 1/2″ pipe connectors. It’s really quite a simple and clever setup.  First, I set a center point 1/2″ in from the end of both the lower and upper control arms and drilled a 7/8″ hole about 1/4″ deep using a hole saw fitted to a hand held drill. In rummaging through the endless drawers of my Dad’s tools I realized he had a number of these which made me wonder, why? Some of them had wood bits still within them from the various projects he had done over the years. Luckily for me he wasn’t one to hesitate to run out and buy a specific tool for a task that he would use only once.

After I drilled the larger, outside hole, I then drilled a smaller hole the same size as the threads of the pipe nut in the photo. The idea here is that the nut would be carefully threaded into these holes. Once threaded down the nut would sit nice and flush in the control arm. To get that nice and flush fit took quite some time since I had to sand, and file carefully to slightly enlarge the hole otherwise the control arm would crack or split altogether. You will want to thread this bolt through so that a few threads are exposed on the opposite side of the control arm. At one point I wasn’t able to easily thread it far enough so rather than push it and risk cracking the control arm I took the hole saw out and drilled down a bit further, allowing the bolt to sit slightly lower in the hole.

At this point the thought did enter my mind as to whether or not this would be strong enough for the boys to ride on, let alone to even drive. I figured that the existence of these plans at least implied it was tested after being built, so I put that thought in the back of my mind and pressed on. In all likelihood the overall structure will only get stronger as more of it gets assembled… right?

Bottom control arm with both spindle holes set.

Bottom control arm with both spindle holes set.

Next I mounted the lower control arm back onto the frame. You can see the holes in the top of the frame rails where I had previously mounted the arms for squaring up the frame. From here you can also see the narrowing of the frame to accommodate the turning of the front wheels. I’m not sure how critical having the frame narrow like this is, since the result is that the back is a few inches wider. The plans call for this so I’ve gone ahead and followed it verbatim. As I quickly realized later, that narrowing is a bit of a pain for a number of reasons but I’ll get to those soon enough.

Before I follow up with the upper control arm I need to now insert the T fittings that get sandwiched in between them. First the large connector nut is carefully screwed into all four holes; two on the lower and the two upper.  Next I insert the T fitting into each nut on the bottom, carefully not forcing it to turn too far, and keeping it slightly loose so that it can turn easily. I’ve also added a bit of white grease to the threads for good measure. The easier these turn back and forth the easier the overall turning will be for the kart, so it’s important to spend the time here to get this right.

In addition to the goal of  free spin here, I found I also needed to account for the vertical space limitation. That is if I had the threads backed off too far the control arms wouldn’t mount back onto the frame without a big gap, but if I threaded them in too tight they wouldn’t turn freely enough. I could always insert a shim or something to account for that extra space, but I really didn’t want to do that.

After an hour or two of sanding, threading, some “Dad is the go kart done yet?“s, more sanding and more threading I was able to get the nuts through and the T fittings in place comfortably.

T Fittings mounted in lower control arms.

T Fittings mounted in lower control arms.

With the T fittings mounted onto the bottom, and enough play to both spin, but tight enough to fit in the space between the two control arms I then mounted the upper control arm back into place. Once the arm is in place and screwed back onto the frame you realize that there really isn’t anywhere for the T fittings to go. Even if they were to completely unscrew (which is virtually impossible since they’d be attached to tie-rods) the control arms have them sandwiched in place so again, a simple and pretty clever assembly overall. My Dad would be proud. 🙂

Once both control arms are in place you can see where the threads on the top of the upper control arm, and bottom of the lower control arm, come through just a bit.

Upper and Lower Control Arms with T Fittings in Place

Upper and Lower Control Arms with T Fittings in Place

The plans call for a 1/2″ electrical conduit lock nut to help to secure these in place.  Although these would do the trick they’re not very attractive. You could also use a galvanized pipe cap, but I realized that a brass garden hose cap fits perfectly and could be polished up quite nice. You can see the brass cap here in this picture with everything all in place nice and tidy like.

So far we have our frame, we have our upper and lower control arms, and spindles all mounted. I’ve even gone so far as to drill the holes into the spindles allowing for me to mount the wheels.

Oh wait, wheels. That’s right this thing needs to roll!!??

I was really anxious when I ordered my plans, even going so far as to pay extra for overnight shipping. The order form indicated as such but they meant for air-mail specifically to account for international delivery. I was quickly informed via email that since they were coming from Texas, and “since as far as we know Texas is still part of the Union we’ll just refund that extra“. That was sure nice. A couple of days later, the plans were in my hand.

IMG_0193

Bugatti Pedal Car Plans

I was definitely not disappointed. I read a note somewhere that these plans were somewhat dated. I suppose you could say that, but not too much so. Apparently they had been published in Popular Mechanics at some point in the early 80s, but since the parts referenced are all from a hardware store it’s all still very applicable. In fact the parts are probably now much cheaper and more common.

You get two full pages, back to back, with accurate illustrations and descriptions of the overall building process. One challenge was in some cases the steps described reference an illustration that was on the back side of the same page. I found myself often flipping the plans back and forth, over and over. It would have been nice to be able to read the descriptions and see the corresponding illustration side by side, but really it’s not a big deal.

It appears the whole thing was set on a typewriter so the layout of some of the text is a bit cramped, specifically the shopping materials list. I ended up just buying the materials as I needed them which was better in my case since I was deviating here and there anyway. No sense in buying materials I wasn’t going to use, although for future reference Home Depot has quite a generous return policy. In cases you may even refer to it as an employee there did as  “a rental policy“. 🙂

IMG_0129

One rail cut out, now tracing for the other.

I started off with the frame rails. Using 2×6 pine I first drew out the dimension, I cut the one out, and then used it as a template for the other side. After cutting them both I then connected them with the rear cross member using 2″ wood screws. I questioned using simple wood screws, but figured that since the target riders are the boys ( < 75lbs )  it would be fine. Should I build a larger one someday, for say, a man in his 30s (wink wink nod nod), I’d use nuts and bolts where I could or come up with an entirely different more robust frame.

Mounting the front upper and lower cross members was a bit of a back and forth procedure. I first cut them out in their raw shape, and mounted them temporarily onto the rails so that I could get the overall frame square and aligned.

I quickly realized that the task of getting the front cross members mounted permanently would be something for another day, since doing this involved drilling the upper and lower mounting points for the kingpins. After a few hours work I have what is beginning to resemble something, just what I wasn’t quite sure of.

IMG_0132

Frame with rear cross member glued and mounted into place.

Even with these first few steps in my mind I’m ultimately picturing the final product. You almost can’t take on a project like this, something that has so many steps that are dependent on one another, unless you can visualize what the end result will be. Without that vision you’re really just walking in the dark hoping that it will turn out to be something worthwhile.

I’m already convinced this will most definitely be something worthwhile. At this point I brought my wife to check out the progress. “Isn’t it looking great!” I said.

Ummm, uhhh yeah.  Looks good.” she enthusiastically replied.

I wanted to say “Non believer! You probably never wanted a go kart when you were little!” but figured it wouldn’t do much good. Better off to just wow her with more progress.

Now the boys, they’d be a good source for moral support, right!?

My oldest keeps saying “Dad, I’m sure I’ll love this go kart even if it doesn’t turn out good.

You guys are killin’ me. Now to find another day when I can sneak in more work.

Cyclekart

Cyclekart

I recently stumbled across the site CycleKarts. This is a site that basically has been put together by some kart enthusiasts that aren’t so much into going fast, but really more into the overall nostalgia aspect and in general having fun approach.

These karts are nothing short of flat out awesome. They’re built with a steel box frame and recycled motorcycle wheels. Since the wheels are larger, about 17″, with the proper detailing at a glance you would mistake these for true original race cars from their heyday. These typically have a small 6 hp engine mounted in the back, but the addition of a false exhaust pipe down one side makes them look all that more accurate.

I’ve always been a huge fan of open wheel racers of the 1920s and 1930s so what better than to build a kart in that style. Although I would love to build one of these, I don’t really have the room to drive, or equipment to weld up something like this. In addition the fact that my boys are pretty young I figured I’d start with something a bit more easy to manage. Maybe I’ll revisit this or something like it at a later time. I know, I know… why someday? For now I’ll be focusing on something that is just more kid friendly.

Bugatti Pedal Car

Bugatti Pedal Car

As it turns out the same guys that have the Cycle Karts site also sell some plans for building a pedal car. They have some great plans available to build a car based on a Bugatti Type 35. The plans are noted as easy to follow and are based on materials that are readily available at most hardware stores. After a bit of poking around I’ve found a great example of one of their other projects, an MG TC. This too is a pedal car.

To get an idea of how the plans with the MG differ, and to see the real world results, I’ve been following a project that is in process with this car at The Norwood Home/Blog. Mark has done a great job with his car, keeping the original look and primarily using the plans, but adapting it to use small bicycle wheels. I too wanted to use bike wheels, but was thinking I wanted something a bit more than a pedal car, but less than a full on racer like the CycleKarts I noted earlier.

Armed with a garage full of tools I went ahead and ordered up the plans and anxiously awaited their arrival.